Health & Human Services

FAQ

Frequently Asked Questions

The following links can help you quickly navigate this page:
Q01. Why should I pursue a career in nursing?
Q02. What is the employment outlook for nurses in the future?
Q03. Do I have to come to a Nursing Program Information Session?
Q04. What are the prerequisites to the nursing program?
Q05. When can I apply to the nursing program?
Q06. Do you have a wait list for your nursing program?
Q07. What if I didn't get accepted into the nursing program this year? Do I have to fill out a new application for next year?
Q08. How many applicants are accepted into the nursing program each year?
Q09. What is the admission process for entry into the nursing program?
Q10.How should I prepare for the TEAS Test?
Q11. Once I’ve been accepted into the nursing program, what happens next?
Q12. What if I have had a felony or misdemeanor conviction? Will I be eligible for the nursing program?
Q13. What if I already have a smart phone? Do I need to purchase an iPod?
Q14. How many days of the week does the nursing program run?
Q15. Can I work while I attend the nursing program?
Q16. Where are the clinical experiences located?

 

Q01. Why should I pursue a career in nursing?[TOP]

A. For many people, a career in nursing is a calling. They want to pursue a career that is concerned with care giving and compassion. For others, nursing is a fast paced and stimulating career that requires the ability to think critically and utilize evidence based practice. In reality, it is a combination of a caring heart and a keen mind.

 

Q02. What is the employment outlook for nurses in the future?[TOP]

A. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the outlook for jobs in nursing remains positive. Nurses continue to find positions in acute care, long term care and home health. As the baby boomers retire, a greater need for registered nurses is anticipated. Advanced practices nurses, those with a master’s degree or higher, especially nurse practitioners will be in high demand throughout Michigan and the US.

 

Q03. Do I have to come to a Nursing Program Information Session?[TOP]

A. Nursing program information sessions are held during the academic year.  The dates and times are posted on the nursing program’s website, as well as throughout campus.  It is highly advisable to attend a program information session so that you can get accurate information regarding the admission process and expectations once you are admitted to the nursing program.

 

Q04. What are the prerequisites to the nursing program?[TOP]

A. The prerequisites to the nursing program are BIO 235 General Anatomy and Physiology I, BIO 236 General Anatomy and Physiology II, ENG 111 Composition I, ENG 112 Composition II, PSY 161 Introduction to Psychology, PSY 261 Developmental Psychology, either  COM 111 Speech or COM 170 Interpersonal Communication.

The prerequisites can be in progress when you apply to the nursing program; however, they must be completed by the end of the winter semester prior to the start of the program in the fall.

Science courses must be taken within five years of entry into the nursing program and you must have a grade of “C” or better.

 

Q05. When can I apply to the nursing program?[TOP]

A. Anytime, from the Admissions tab on your student account. For a fall entry, you can apply anytime until January 31st. Go to the Admissions tab on your student account and select Health Sciences application.

 

Q06. Do you have a wait list for your nursing program?[TOP]

A. No, there is no wait list. Applicants who are not admitted to the nursing program must apply for the following year.

 

Q07. What if I didn't get accepted into the nursing program this year? Do I have to fill out a new application for next year?[TOP]

A. Yes, each year that you apply for the nursing program, you must complete a new application form.

 

Q08. How many applicants are accepted into the nursing program each year?[TOP]

A. Forty-six students are accepted into the nursing program each year. 

 

Q09. What is the admission process for entry into the nursing program?[TOP]

A. Admission into the nursing program is based on a ranked competitive process. Applicants apply to the program and are ranked by score based on GPA (Grade Point Average) of the prerequisites and TEAS score.

The TEAS test is the Test of Essential Academic Skills and is a standardized test that many nursing programs throughout the country use as one part of the admission process. The TEAS test gives us information as to how successful potential students may be in the nursing program. After we receive your application by January 31, you will be mailed a letter informing you how to register for the TEAS test. It takes approximately 4 hours to complete and is administered in Learning Support Services in the Student Center.  The cost is approximately $55 USD.

Once students are ranked, the top 46 students are accepted into the program. Letters of acceptance are mailed out in June.

Q10. How should I prepare for the TEAS Test?[TOP]

A.Individuals may contact Assessment Technologies Institute (ATI) or by calling toll free at (800) 667-7531 for information on how to obtain review materials. By logging onto ATI’s website, students can purchase various study materials from their online store. Our school library has two study guides on loan that can be checked out of the library.

 

Q11. Once I’ve been accepted into the nursing program, what happens next?[TOP]

A. Once you’ve received your letter of acceptance, you will need to either accept or decline your space in the nursing program.  In addition, we have a mandatory nursing program orientation day where we review the expectations of the nursing program in detail. We also give you information about what equipment and uniforms you will need to purchase prior to the start of the fall semester. You will receive forms for your primary care provider to perform a physical examination and a list of information on required immunizations. 

 

Q12. What if I have had a felony or misdemeanor conviction? Will I be eligible for the nursing program?[TOP]

A. All clinical agencies require that we perform a criminal background check on our prospective nursing students because they will be working with vulnerable populations. If you’ve had a serious misdemeanor or felony conviction, you may not be eligible to be in a clinical facility or take the Registered Nurse licensure exam for a defined period of time. If you have questions or concerns, please refer to the Michigan Long Term Care Partners Legal Guide or arrange a meeting to speak with the Associate Dean of Nursing for more information.

 

Q13. Besides uniforms, what other special supplies will I need for the nursing program?[TOP]

A. In addition to navy blue scrubs and proper shoes, you will also need to purchase a name tag, stethoscope, watch with a sweep second hand, and a nursing kit with bandage scissors, flashlight and goggles. You must also have a tablet or smart phone with 8GB of memory and Skyscape software for the first day of classes. 

 

Q14. How many days of the week does the nursing program run?[TOP]

A. Over the course of the four semesters of the nursing program, the number of days of the week range from three days a week to five days a week.  Clinical experiences are a variety of days and hours from 7 a.m. to as late as 11:30 p.m. The length of a clinical shift may vary from four hours to 12 hours depending on the rotation. Clinical experiences may also include weekends.

 

Q15. Can I work while I attend the nursing program?[TOP]

A. The average number of contact hours per semester is 15 to 18. In addition to the time spent in theory and clinical courses, it is strongly recommended that students spend an additional 2 hours per contact hour each week reading, studying, researching and practicing clinical skills in order to safely care for patients. This would add up to another 30 to 36 hours in addition to the clinical and class time, so you could compare the effort invested into the nursing program to be equivalent to that needed to maintain a full-time job.

We recommend that students consider significantly limiting the amount of time that they work each week to no more than 12 to 16 hours in order to give themselves an adequate amount of time to learn all you need to in order to be a safe and effective nurse.

 

Q16. Where are the clinical experiences located?[TOP]

A. North Central is fortunate to have clinical agreements in a variety of settings which allow students to see the full range of nursing experiences. Clinical sites are not only in Petoskey but at various agencies in Charlevoix, Cheboygan, East Jordan, Gaylord, Harbor Springs, Mancelona and Traverse City. As a result, students are expected to have dependable transportation at all times.